Programming Paradigms - Computerphile - - vimore.org

Programming Paradigms - Computerphile

Programming Paradigms - Computerphile

YouTube

There are different styles of programming, some quite closely resemble pure mathematics. Mathematician and Computer Scientist Laurence Day compares two of them. Note: In the Java code the delimiters within the 'for' loop should be semi-colons, not commas. Apologies for the error. What if the Universe is a Computer Simulation: http://youtu.be/YOxDb_BbXzU Sights and Sounds of Sorting with BASIC: http://youtu.be/Ou2A-JWszVA http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. See the full list of Brady's video projects at: http://bit.ly/bradychannels



4 Programming Paradigms In 40 Minutes

One of the most important lessons I've learned is that programming languages are tools and not all tools are good for all jobs. Some tasks are easier to solve f

YouTube

What if the Universe is a Computer Simulation? - Computerphile

Free book: http://www.audible.com/computerphile What if the Universe is just a computer simulation? What is fundamental particles are really just "bits"? Featu

YouTube

Functional Programming & Haskell - Computerphile

Just what is functional programming? We asked a member of the team that created Haskell: John Hughes, Professor of Computer Science at Chalmers University of Te

YouTube

19. Dynamic Programming I: Fibonacci, Shortest Paths

MIT 6.006 Introduction to Algorithms, Fall 2011 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-006F11 Instructor: Erik Demaine License: Creative Commons BY-NC-

YouTube

Binary: Plusses & Minuses (Why We Use Two's Complement) - Computerphile

Negative Binary Numbers - you may have heard of 'signed' numbers, but do you know how they work? Professor Brailsford explains not just how, but why we use the

YouTube

Phone Buttons - Numberphile

Get a free book from Audible: http://www.audible.com/numberphile Why are phone buttons laid out as they are? Sarah Wiseman discusses. More links & stuff in full

YouTube

The Art of Abstraction - Computerphile

Abstraction is at the heart of everything to do with computing. James Clewett takes us through the layers abstracting the pixels forming this text on screen fro

YouTube

Network Address Translation - Computerphile

IPv4 ran out of space, so how are we still all looking at the internet? - NAT has the answer! - Richard Mortier explains how the IP address space was expanded u

YouTube

Just How do Macs and PCs Differ? - Computerphile

Following on from our contentious 'Mac or PC' film, we asked Professor Tom Rodden just what the actual difference is between Mac and PC. (by PC we are referring

YouTube

The Most Difficult Program to Compute? - Computerphile

The story of recursion continues as Professor Brailsford explains one of the most difficult programs to compute: Ackermann's function. Professor Brailsford's p

YouTube

British Numbers confuse Americans - Numberphile

Title changed for Grey!!! Two Americans living in England discuss the numeric nuances which cause them problems. More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓

YouTube

Lambda Calculus - Computerphile

The basis of almost all functional programming, Professor Graham Hutton explains Lambda Calculus. http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/com

YouTube

Where GREP Came From - Computerphile

Commonly used grep was written overnight, but why and how did it get its name? Professor Brian Kernighan explains. EXTRA BITS: https://youtu.be/bSaBe6WiC2s I

YouTube

AI's Game Playing Challenge - Computerphile

AlphaGo is beating humans at Go - What's the big deal? Rob Miles explains what AI has to do to play a game. What on Earth is Recursion?: https://youtu.be/Mv9NE

YouTube

How Computer Memory Works - Computerphile

How do logic gates store information? - We explore how computer memory works with Dr. Steve "Heartbleed" Bagley Domino Addition -- Numberphile: http://youtu.be

YouTube

What is a Monad? - Computerphile

Monads sound scary, but Professor Graham Hutton breaks down how handy they can be. https://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile

YouTube

Punch Card Programming - Computerphile

How did punch card systems work? Professor Brailsford delves further into the era of mainframe computing with this hands-on look at punch cards. Extra Material

YouTube

Animated GIFs and Space vs Time - Computerphile

Whether its the Darwin Award nominees or simply another crazy cat, animated GIFs have a lot to answer for. They're also a perfect example of one of Computer Sci

YouTube

Computing Limit - Computerphile

Just how far can we go with processing speed? Physicist Professor Phil Moriarty talks about the hard limits of computing. Technical physics (aside) video: http

YouTube

Floating Point Numbers - Computerphile

Why can't floating point do money? It's a brilliant solution for speed of calculations in the computer, but how and why does moving the decimal point (well, in

YouTube